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FAQ

What is bacterial vaginosis?

Most vaginas smell a little from time to time, and it’s usually nothing to worry about. But if the odor coming from your vaginal tract is strong and reminiscent of rotten fish, it could be a sign of bacterial vaginosis, or BV. Bacterial vaginosis is the most common vaginal infection that causes vaginal odor, affecting as many as one in four women in Europe. Women of childbearing age have the highest risk for BV, but you may become infected at any age. Although BV is caused by a bacterial imbalance and isn’t considered a sexually transmitted disease, it can increase your risk of contracting a more serious disease, for example chlamydia. T he good news is that BV is easily treated and prevented with natural products that you can buy online or at your local pharmacy.

What is a vaginal yeast infection?

Is your vagina feeling itchy and irritated? Have you noticed a thick, white and clumpy discharge? Do you even feel a burning sensation around the vaginal opening when you go to the bathroom? Then you may very well have a yeast infection – and you’re not alone. As many as three out of four women have yeast at least once in their lifetime and many women suffer from recurring infections. Fortunately, yeast infections are not dangerous and most of them are easily treated and prevented with products that you can buy online or find at your local pharmacy.

Why is my vagina dry?

Hot flashes and irregular periods are two well-known signs that menopause could be knocking on the door. But did you know that vaginal dryness and vaginal irritation are other common menopausal symptoms? Because as you age, so does your vagina. Normally, estrogen helps lubricate the vagina and keep it healthy, but when you hit menopause, the production of the female sex hormone drops significantly. As a result, the tissues of the vagina become thinner, dryer and more prone to inflammation, a condition that is called vaginal atrophy. But menopause isn’t the only reason why your estrogen levels may drop. Childbirth, breastfeeding, certain medical conditions and taking oral contraception can also decrease estrogen and in turn lead to vaginal dryness. In some cases, a dry vagina is not related to estrogen at all, but to excessive hygiene practices. Regardless of what’s causing your vagina to feel like the Sahara Desert, there are safe and effective treatments that can help